Male Menopause – True Medical Condition

MALE MENOPAUSE

Published on July 27, 2010 in THE PALM BEACH POST

Middle-aged? Tired? Not Interested in sex? Male Menopause?

Is male menopause a true medical condition? or just a good punch line when you’re 50-something and not feeling quite yourself?
You know, “Oh, that male menopause must have kicked in”?

Could your doctor really diagnose male menopause, or is it merely a phrase that Oprah or GQ use to hook you? My middle-aged male editor wanted to know. No punch lines here, my friend, er, boss. There is such a thing as male menopause (though technically the name is all wrong – but we’ll get to that). Is every man destined for the same hot flashes and mood swings they dread to see in the women they love? That’s another story.

But the hormonal change is real and so are a multitude of symptoms that can accompany it – from a loss in libido or erectile dysfunction to fatigue or depression. And, yes, sometimes even night sweats. Every woman who lives long enough will experience menopause – a (permanent) pause in her menstrual cycle that signals the end to the steady stream of the hormone estrogen her body makes. Hence the name menopause. Normally, this happens between the ages of 45 and 50. And the dramatic drop in hormones can trigger all sorts of physical and psychological changes.

Conversely, the hormone faucet in men never turns off. But the flow of testosterone does begin to gradually decrease at a rate of about 1 percent a year beginning at age 30. And for some men, the result over the years can be simply unpleasant or potentially life-changing.

While some call it male menopause, doctors often call these age-related hormone changes in men “andropause” – from the word androgen, a term to describe hormones such as testosterone.

How common is Male Menopause?
It’s unclear how many men develop andropause. A study of more than 3,000 European men published in the June 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine suggests the number is only perhaps 2 percent of the population. Anecdotally, some doctors say that number seems low.

“It’s certainly higher than that one study would suggest,” said Dr. Lawrence Hakim, chairman of the Department of Urology at the Cleveland Clinic in Weston . It may be a matter of definition, Hakim and others suggest.

Diagnosis a challenge

There is no single way to test for andropause, explains Dr. Robert Tan, author of The Andropause Mystery and founder of the OPAL Medical Clinic, which specializes in men’s health and aging. A lab test is needed to figure out how much testosterone a man produces, plus a look at his overall health.

How low is low testosterone? It depends who you ask. Studies have defined low testosterone in men as 250 nanograms per deciliter, while others cite 300. Men in their 20s and 30s typically have testosterone levels in the 600 range. But a low number by itself is not enough. “Every man is different,” said Dr. Erik Castle, a urologist with the Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “You may have a 70-year-old who is healthy, never smoked, eats right, has low testosterone, but is fine. You have another, maybe he didn’t live so cleanly and now is unhealthy and not feeling well.” For that guy, Castle says, you have to look closer.

What are you looking for in low Testosterone Symptoms?
Erectile dysfunction. Reduced sex drive. Fewer morning erections.

Doctors also often look for fatigue, problems walking long distances, bending or stooping. And even if you have low testosterone and you’re tired, your problem could be something else entirely – diabetes, thyroid issues, a side effect from medication or alcohol abuse.

Hormone therapy poses risks
Doctors once addressed andropause only when a man complained that his sex life was suffering, Mayo Clinic’s Castle said.
“But over the last 10 years, the emerging evidence is that this may not just be a quality of life issue because they can’t get erections,” Castle said, “Now we think it could be a health issue as well.” He said men with truly low testosterone levels can have lower bone density, and may be at greater risk of diabetes or coronary artery disease.

Now men and their doctors can consider replenishing the testosterone if those health risks are in play. But proceed with caution.

Google “male menopause” and you may be steered to a screen full of “health centers” touting hormone therapy for a myriad of ills.

“You really want to seek out a center where you can work with a urologist, an endocrinologist,” Hakim of Cleveland Clinic said. “It’s part of the bigger picture. These places tend to focus on one thing – not the big picture.”

And, just as women must consider the risks of hormone therapy, so should men, advises the Mayo Clinic.

In its primer on male menopause, the clinic notes “Testosterone therapy has various risks.”

Such therapy could contribute to sleep apnea, put you at greater risk for heart disease, cause skin problems or stimulate the growth of existing prostate cancer.

Tan, the author who first published on the topic a decade ago, says he can’t help but notice how the public awareness of andropause has grown.

“There has been more interest, scientific work and certainly more patients coming forth with symptoms and treated successfully.”

By Sonja Isger
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Source: THE PALM BEACH POST July 27, 2010

When MALE MENOPAUSE
kicks in …

Some men have lower than normal testosterone without signs or symptoms. But others may experience:

CHANGES IN SEXUAL FUNCTION.
This can mean less desire, fewer spontaneous erections, erectile dysfunction.

CHANGES IN SLEEP PATTERNS, for example insomnia.

PHYSICAL CHANGES.
More fat, less muscle bulk and strength, swollen or tender breasts, hair loss, less energy or hot flashes.

EMOTIONAL CHANGES.
Feeling sad or depressed, difficulty concentrating or remembering things.

Source: The Mayo Clinic

To learn more about Testosterone in Men, Male Hormone Replacement Therapy to Treat Low T in Men, Testosterone Prescriptions for Injectable Testosterone, Growth Hormone Prescriptions and Injectable HGH, Somatropin for Injection, HGH Replacement, Human Growth Hormone and Male Menopause – Andropause and Hypogonadism, and to review the symptoms of Male Menopause caused by Low Testosterone Levels, visit the following Testosterone Information Links to review Testosterone Replacement Treatments and Therapies.


Hormone Replacement for Men: Pros, Cons

Testosterone Hormone Replacement & HGH Injections


Testosterone Replacement May Lower Risk of Heart Disease, Diabetes, Death, but Long-Term Effects Unclear

By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

June 18, 2008 — Testosterone replacement therapy can help older men deficient in the hormone reduce their risks of heart disease, diabetes, and death, according to new research presented this week at ENDO 08, the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society.

”The goal of testosterone treatment is to keep the levels within normal range,” says Farid Saad, director of scientific affairs for Bayer Schering Pharma in Berlin. Saad presented two of the studies at the meeting, held in San Francisco. Bayer Schering Pharma makes several testosterone products.

Low levels of testosterone are common with age, Saad says, occurring in about 18% of 70-year-olds. Low levels of testosterone, he says, are associated with the metabolic syndrome — a cluster of risk factors such as abnormal cholesterol and high blood pressure that boost risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes as well as other risks to health.

In the studies, Saad and his colleagues found that testosterone replacement therapy reduced the metabolic syndrome risk factors and did so in a similar way in all the age ranges studied.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Heart Disease Risks

In the first study, Saad’s team looked at 95 men, aged 34 to 69, with low levels of testosterone.

All had metabolic syndrome. Those who have this diagnosis must have three of five risk factors: increased waist circumference, low “good” cholesterol or HDL, high triglycerides, elevated blood pressure, and elevated blood sugar.

“We treated them for at least a year,” he tells WebMD. Every three months, they measured cholesterol, waist circumference, and other parameters.

The testosterone replacement was given as a long-acting injection, every three months. The same product is not yet available in the U.S., Saad says, although other types are.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy: Test Results

“We saw a consistent improvement of the parameters of metabolic syndrome,” Saad says. The men were not given a special diet or exercise program.

The supplemental testosterone reduced total cholesterol, “bad” LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and body mass index while improving “good” HDL cholesterol. The men lost their pot bellies, Saad says. “What we see after 12 months is a reduction in two or three trouser sizes, three or four inches off the waist. We see a reduction by one-fourth to one-third of their total cholesterol.”

No adverse effects were reported, he says.

While hormone replacement therapy for women has been found to be associated with increased risks of heart disease and other problems, Saad doesn’t foresee that will be the case with testosterone replacement. “There are fundamental differences between hormone replacement in women and testosterone treatment in men,” he tells WebMD.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy: No Age Effects?

In a second study, Saad divided the same 95 men into three groups, based on age: less than 57, 57 to 63, and older than 63.

They found the older men and the younger men had similar improvement in their risk factors.

“There are some precautions with testosterone supplementation,” Saad tells WebMD. “We need to monitor the prostate.”

“It is well known that with prostate cancer, the cancer is usually dependent on testosterone. Prostate cancer is a slow-growing tumor.” Cancer of the gland must be ruled out before starting supplements, he says. He also advises routine prostate checkups while on treatment.

A test to monitor red blood cell formation, called a hematocrit, is needed, too. “Testosterone increases red blood cells,” he says. In excess, it can theoretically boost heart attack or stroke risk.

Testosterone and Death Risk

Low testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of death, according to Robin Haring, a researcher from the Institute for Community Medicine at Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University in Griefswald, Germany, who presented the finding at the meeting.

He evaluated data on nearly 2,000 men, aged 20 to 79, who participated in the Study of Health in Pomerania, following them for seven years until August 2007. He noted testosterone levels, age, weight, smoking habits, and physical activity. The drugmaker Novo Nordisk partly funded the study.

During the follow-up, 226 men died. “Men with low testosterone have a more than twofold higher risk of death during the follow-up period,” he says.

They were more likely to die of cardiovascular disease and cancer, but not of other causes.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy: Long-Term Effects Unknown

Another researcher, Jane F. Reckelhoff, PhD, professor of physiology and biophysics at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, offers a caveat about supplemental testosterone: “We don’t know what the long-terms effects are. The safety studies have not been done and they need to be done.”

She reviewed the studies for WebMD and has published on a review about testosterone supplements for the American Journal of Physiology Renal Physiology.

Her chief concerns: “Testosterone [in excess] can increase blood pressure and compromise kidney function.”

But an advocate of testosterone replacement therapy, Martin Miner, MD, co-director of the Men’s Health Center at the Miriam Hospital of Brown University in Providence, R.I., says the studies show that restoring testosterone when it is low improves metabolic syndrome factors and could help prevent type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risks.

He agrees close monitoring of men on testosterone is needed. “Checking hematocrit, PSA (prostate-specific antigen), and lower urinary tract symptoms in men is vital to the management of testosterone replacement therapy,” he says

To learn more about Testosterone Replacement Therapy: Testosterone Replacement Therapy or Testosterone Replacement Therapy for Men

Visit a hormone clinic to learn about HRT Hormone Replacement Therapy and the many hormone physicians centers available: Hormone Clinic: HGH Hormone Treatment and Testosterone Replacement Therapy @ AAG Health Hormone Physician’s Center – www.aaghealth.com or Testosterone Replacement Therapy for Men

To learn more about HGH Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy: HGH: Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy @ HGHTherapy.com, HGH Hormone Clinic @ AAGHealth.com or HGH Injection @ HGHTherapy.com

Testosterone & HGH World News

Testosterone News From Around The World


Manopause – Testosterone Hormone Deficiency

Men are now becoming aware that a hormone imbalance and decline over the years can effect them just as it does women. This decline in male hormone levels and the variety of treatments to address symptoms caused by an androgen deficiency is now becoming a greater part of a man’s health care. The term “Manopause” has been coined for this health issue affecting men. The two most important hormones that begin their decline are testosterone and human growth hormone. See a relevant video on the topic of male hormone deficiency and read more about men’s version of menopause in these articles below.

Manopause – Men’s Version of Menopause caused by an Androgen Deficiency.

Tired? Irritable? Low sex drive? You may have “manopause”. Manopause is an alternative term for low testosterone, and it can really change your life. View a video of a guy in Idaho who started testosterone therapy with his doctor and has never looked back. Some claim we can tell how much testosterone the average man is producing just by looking at the size of his waist. If a man’s waist is larger than 40 inches, he will produce about 30 per cent less testosterone than a man with a waist that measures 37 inches or less.

Testosterone therapy helps breast cancer survivors. Researchers recently published data showing that sustained release testosterone, used with the estrogen blocker anastrozole, is effective therapy that helps improve quality of life for breast cancer survivors.

An important male health note: Pesticides found on fruit and vegetables could be doing untold damage to male fertility, research suggests. Thirty of 37 crop chemicals tested interfered with the action of testosterone, the sex hormone critical to a healthy male reproductive system.

To learn more about men’s health and hormone replacement therapy including testosterone and hgh hormone replacement therapy – visit an expert in the field of male hormone replacement, Hormone Replacement Therapy



AAG Health Featured Testosterone Article

Testosterone and Negotiation. Research from the Kellogg School finds that testosterone plays a forceful role in the way we negotiate. The negotiating process for your desired salary, for example, might depend more on hormone levels than the economy, according to the new study.

The study examines whether exposure to prenatal testosterone, the testosterone we are exposed to as babies in the womb, predicts aggressive responses to unfair offers during bargaining. The research finds that individual differences in testosterone predict whether one will act in retaliation after receiving an unfair offer. Those with higher testosterone levels made lower return offers after they themselves received an unfair offer.

“This research holds important implications for our understanding of the relationship between social challenges and the levels of testosterone present during early prenatal development,” said Adam Galinsky, the Morris and Alice Kaplan Professor of Ethics and Decision in Management at Kellogg. “As anticipated, the effects of testosterone during sensitive developmental periods do not motivate aggressive behavior per se, but rather increase the appeal of getting even.”

Additionally, the test also found that the testosterone level did not alter the perceived fairness of low-ball offers but predicted how people responded to this fairness. Those with higher levels of testosterone were more likely to act on their sense of unfairness by retaliating in response. “Our results have implications for situations with opportunities for repeat negotiations, especially in the workplace and when the power relationships might be changing,” said Galinsky.

“The takeaway is that if you push too hard against a person with high testosterone, then when the tables are turned they will fire back at you. For example, executives who are on the losing end of a salary negotiation might take his or her client list after they leave the company.” The new study, entitled “Lex talionis: Testosterone and the law of retaliation,” will be published in a forthcoming issue of Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

If you think you might be suffering from Testosterone Hormone Deficiency also known as Low T, visit the hormone replacement specialists at AAG Health and The Anti-Aging Group of Physicians or take the low hormone symptoms test online at: Androgen Deficiency – Low Hormone Test

Learn more about hormone replacement therapy for men to treat andropause known as andropause – Men’s Hormone Replacement Therapy

Testosterone Replacement Therapy is becoming common for treating low testosterone levels in men – Testosterone Replacement Therapy


Video News Story by Carolyn Holly
Bio | Email | Follow: @KTVB


Low Testosterone

Low Testosterone Could Kill You?


Low Levels of Male Hormone May be More Dangerous Than Previously Thought. Too low of a level could kill you.

By SUPINDA BUNYAVANICH, M.D., ABC News Medical Unit

Low Testosterone in Men

Low testosterone may lead to a greater risk of death, according to a study presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Toronto.

Men with low testosterone had a 33 percent greater death risk over their next 18 years of life compared with men who had higher testosterone, according to the study conducted by Dr. Elizabeth Barrett-Connor and colleagues at the University of California at San Diego.

“It’s very exciting and potentially a groundbreaking study,” said Barrett-Connor. “But it needs to be confirmed.”

The study tracked nearly 800 men, 50 to 91 years old, living in California. Their testosterone level was measured at the beginning of the study, and their health was then tracked over the next 20 years.

How Low Is Low?

Testosterone normally declines as men get older. However, a clear definition of “low” testosterone does not yet exist.

“No one knows what low really is,” said Dr. Joel Finkelstein, endocrinologist and associate professor at Harvard Medical School. “The study authors defined it at 250 [nanograms per deciliter], which is a definition, but no one has figured out what low is.”

Barrett-Connor and her colleagues found that nearly 30 percent of the men they studied met their criterion score of 250 or lower for low testosterone.

They noted that many men with this definition of low testosterone were “healthy men in the community who would not know that they had low testosterone.”

Men With Hot Flashes

Symptoms of low testosterone depend on how low the level is. At the lowest levels, men will have hot flashes, much like those experienced by women during menopause.

“At levels not quite that low, men have decreases in their libido, erectile dysfunction, fatigue and physiological changes many will not immediately recognize,” Finkelstein said, adding that these could include loss of strength, decrease in bone density and decreased muscle mass.

To learn more about low testosterone, low testosterone symptoms, andropause or menopause in men and low testosterone treatment, visit: Low Testosterone

Testosterone Therapy for Men and Testosterone Replacement with Injections for Men are becoming the new way to combat andropause known as male menopause and some symptoms of menopause in women. Testosterone can help increase sex drive, performance and libido. Testosterone is also known to help relieve symptoms due to hormone deficiency like depression, insomnia or other sleep problems, weight gain, osteoporosis, erectile dysfunction and muscle loss. To learn more about male hormone replacement therapy visit: Testosterone Therapy for Men Testosterone Therapy for Men

Testosterone Therapy for Women Testosterone Therapy for Women

Low Testosterone Levels in Men can cause erectile dysfunction, loss of sex drive and desire. Learn how to increase Testosterone Levels using Male Hormone Replacement Therapy with Testosterone Injections, a Bio-Identical Hormone Treatment Product for Low T Therapy used by Testosterone Doctors and Clinics – Male Hormone Replacement Testosterone Therapy for Low T

Learn How Testosterone Treatment can Help: Testosterone Treatment for Men